Monday, December 4, 2023

What About You, Josh McBride? - Book Tour

 


YA Contemporary

Date Published: 10-24-2023

Publisher: Creative James Media

Josh and Elliot have been living in the shadows of their inner demons for far too long.


Josh McBride was the angry, emotionally avoidant one, while Elliot was the invisible, anxious, carer. When they ended up in Cruxby together and discovered their family’s history, that all had to change. Except, old habits were hard to break.

If life had dealt them a different hand, they could have reached their potential. Elliot should have been a confident performer and Josh should have been able to perform in his courses to go on to joinery school.

But this isn’t some fairy tale, and Josh can’t stay in class, let alone an exam. He believes he’s stupid and that’s all there is to it. Elliot has a chance in the talent show if his audition goes well, but the anxiousness from his past creeps in from every angle.

Will these two be able to rise above their pasts and create their own destinies, or will their demons win in the end?

 

 


Read An Excerpt Below


About the Author

Kate grew up in a small town in Lancashire, England with her mum, dad and two older brothers. A bit of a tomboy, she loved nothing more than going out for adventures with her brothers, as long as she was back before dark. She studied English at Reading University and gained a teaching qualification at Manchester. Nowadays, Kate spends her days teaching English at a local high school in Cheshire and her evenings are spent writing stories close to her heart. She believes teenage years can be particularly difficult and wants to create stories that show empathy and hope for her readers. She lives with her husband, two children and Jessie, the Miniature Schnauzer.

 

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Excerpt from "What About You, Josh McBride"

“It’s important to acknowledge,” Marshall interrupts. “All of Josh’s teachers have commented on a vast improvement in his behaviour and attitude this year.”

Fat lot of good that’s doing. I’m still the thicko at the bottom of the class, still in the bottom set for Maths with Benjamin-picks-his-nose-andstares-out-the-window-Rivers and Max-can’t-control-hisanger-and-throws-chairs-across-the-room-Robinson. If someone listened to me for one damn second, I could explain that I do get it. I can work it out. It takes me a little bit longer and I don’t know why, maybe Gavin Turner gave me a dud brain gene and part of my brain doesn’t work like others. Then why’s Elliot so annoyingly clever? He doesn’t have a dud brain gene; he’s destined to go to all the top universities and probably discover the cure for cancer. We’re like twins separated at birth, an experiment to see how each will turn out. Ha! Look at this twin, try all he might, he will always be stupid.

Throw him away!

Discard him!

He’s good for nothing!

“Josh,” Marshall’s staring at me. “Did you hear me? I was explaining to your mum that I’ve spoken to Mrs Stephens because I think there’s something else going on. I’ve thought about it for a while so I can only apologise to both of you that it's taken this long to get a meeting organised and especially with your final exams on the horizon.”

Ahh, finally, someone else believes in the dud brain gene too!

“We would like you to take a test.”

“A test?” He does love his tests. All three of them are staring at me now. Saff sits down on the floor and finishes the sandwich. Miss looks at me and smiles whilst Mum mouths sorry.

“Sorry. Not a test. That’s the wrong choice of words. A dyslexia screening. They can help give an indication of dyslexia. They don’t provide a formal diagnosis but can help outline your strengths and weaknesses. After that, if needed, we can look at a formal diagnosis. The screening would allow us to see if there’s a reason why you struggle at times, then we can give you the support you need and deserve, especially in the lead up to the exams. Everyone should have an equal starting point, shouldn’t they?”

 I think of Steve and Gavin. My starting point has never been … equal.

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